Blind Spot
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Detail)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Polyptych of 9 images | Each 21 X 16.5 inches (53.3 X 41.9 cm) | Edition of 3 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

Blind Spot (Family)
2011 | Fine art archival print | Triptych | 16 X 38 inches (40.64 X 96.52 cm) | Edition of 2 + 2 AP

Skin Deep

Best captured by the iconic head shot portrait most commonly seen in identification documents, our faces - like a visual shorthand - are one of the first markers of identity others use to recognize us.

The perception of others upon our skin inform our personal sense of self - we think we are who others think we are; therefore we act accordingly, often adhering to the perimeters of social protocol. Color within the lines - no surprises.

Persistence of Memory

Try standing before a blank wall instead of the mirror, and attempt to recall your own face. Our mind's eye can almost imagine ourselves based on our memory recall of that last glimpse we caught of ourselves. But one can pause to ask if that truly represents who we are, or do our true selves endure deeply beyond our skin - as the life that goes on behind our faces?

I, Again

The word "palimpsest" (palin "again" + psao "I scrape") denotes a papyrus or parchment manuscript in which the original text has been scraped off, and the skin reused with new text written over the earlier writing which may still be partially visible.

I use a similar method in my first installation of a series of nine portraitures of my friends. The moment they stepped into my apartment, I snapped a photo of them. Then I asked them to apply a white mask-like makeup on their faces in an attempt to erase their facial features. Only then did I sit them down to project their first photo taken onto their currently 'erased' face, thus creating a new image and identity of themselves.

The First Shall Be Last; And the Last Shall be First

Emptied of themselves, my sitters has become a blank slate onto which I can project and layer their initial headshots. When we scrutinize the newly created image, we can see their tightly-closed eyes - symbolizing a fiercely guarded inner world and emotional reality. Thus, the fissure between our external social facade and our inner hidden self becomes doubly exposed.

Under My Skin

Placed beside the first series, this second installation consists of three images - the faces of my family members (dad, mum and my brother). These faces are projected onto my face, symbolizing my own personal identity as an Asian man with perceived family responsibilities. They have become inextricably tied with my identity and pressing priorities. Thus my family is my own palimpsest - forever written over my face and recognized as a thumbnail of my personal history and emotional loyalties.

(...close)

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